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Spring 2023 Class Schedule

Spring 2023 class Schedule

Course Title Instructor Day/Time Lab(s)
101 Earth Science for the 21st Century Jacobsen TTH 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM
180 Fantasy Worlds - How to Build Your Own Planet Mulyukova TTH 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM
201 Earth Systems Revealed Jacobson MWF 1:00 PM - 1:50 PM W 2:00 PM - 3:50 PM or Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM
301 Petrology: Evolution of Crustal and Mantle Rocks Bina TTh 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM W 11:00 AM - 12:50 PM or W 2:00 PM - 3:50 PM
330 Sedimentary Geology Sageman TTh 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM
343 Earth System Modeling Horton TTh 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM
370 Geobiology Osburn TTh 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM F 11:00 AM - 12:50 PM
438 Advanced Topics in Geophysics Bina TTh 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM
450 Communicating Science Beyond Academia Axford M 2:00 PM - 4:50 PM

 

Spring 2023 course descriptions

101 – Earth Science for the 21st Century

Introduction to earth science through topical issues facing contemporary society. Evolution of the earth, geologic hazards, natural resources, peak oil, climate change, the water cycle, nuclear fuel cycle, geology of US national parks. Natural Sciences Distro Area

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180 – Fantasy Worlds - How to Build Your Own Planet

The formation and evolution of rocky planets. Introduction of physical concepts common in the lives of planets as they are in our everyday lives: gravity, heat transport, magnetism, and others. Students will apply these concepts to build their own unique planet, and will present their creation at a culminating poster presentation.

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201 – Earth Systems Revealed

Introduction to Physical Geology: The study of Earth systems and their interactions. This course will approach the study of Earth systems from two perspectives: 1) description and classification of Earth's features, including Earth materials, internal structure, and landforms and 2) description and explanation of the physical, chemical and biological processes that form and modify these features. Topics include minerals; sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks; the interior Earth, oceans, and atmosphere; solid Earth processes, such as volcanism, seismicity, and plate tectonics and their interactions with the atmosphere and hydrosphere to drive surface Earth processes, such as climate, weathering, and glaciation; geologic time; global change. Recommended Background: At least one credit in math, chemistry, biology or physics. Natural Sciences Distro Area

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301 – Petrology: Evolution of Crustal and Mantle Rocks

Origin, composition, and classification of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. Application of laboratory characterization and basic thermodynamics to interpreting observed rock textures and mineral assemblages in terms of geological processes. Natural Sciences Distro Area

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330 – Sedimentary Geology

Sedimentary rocks; stratigraphy; local, regional, and global correlation. Ancient depositional systems; facies analysis in context of tectonic, eustatic, and climatic controls on deposition. Recommended Background: EARTH 201-0 or consent of instructor.

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343 – Earth System Modeling

Introduction to the art and science of reducing Earth's complex systems into simple numerical models to build a better understanding of how components interact and evolve. Recommended Background: At least one 200-level course in Earth or Environmental Science, one course in each of calculus and physics. Natural Sciences Distro Area

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370 – Geobiology

This course will evaluate the interplay between biological and physical processes in shaping the surface Earth. Major topics include: the role of microbes in major element cycling (C, N, S, P), historical geobiology (how has life changed the planet over time?), methodologies applied in geobiology, humans as agents of geobiology, and the related fields of astro/exobiology. Taught with CIV_ENV 317-0; may not receive credit for both courses. Natural Sciences Distro Area

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438 – Advanced Topics in Geophysics

Topics include tectonophysics and the bodily structure of the earth, dislocation theory in earth motions, glaciology, geochronology, and emerging and new areas of geophysics.

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450 – Communicating Science Beyond Academia

Through reading, discussion, writing and peer critique, this course will explore strategies for successful scientific communication beyond academia. How can scientists break through barriers to understanding and foster engagement with scientific information, while still conveying nuance and uncertainty? What happens when science becomes politicized and controversial? This seminar is open to graduate students in all STEM disciplines, with preference to students who have begun to conduct independent research.

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